Excellent Work-From-Home Job Opportunities

“Make Thousands of Dollars Working from Home!” sounds like a scam and most of the time, it is. But, the great news is, remote work options are available and they are on the rise.
Whether you want to work at your house in your pajamas, from your local coffee shop, or while traveling the world, the following companies can help you achieve your Work-From-Home desires.

  • Apple

    Tech giant Apple has At Home Advisor position that allows employees to work remotely as customer support agents. The role is to translate technology into a language customers can understand. The position offers benefits such as employee discounts, the opportunity to grow with Apple, and a free iMac to use while working from home. The job is also a great gig for college students, who can schedule their work around classes.

  • Xerox

    Xerox has an extensive WFH program of over 8,000 home-based employees, which is known as theVirtual Workforce Program. Home-based employees are involved in a variety of functions, including customer care, tech support, quality control, software development, and much more.

  • Dell

    Although Dell is headquartered in Round Rock, Texas, the company offers employee work options that include flextime, remote work, job sharing, part-time work, and compressed workweeks. Current openings for flexible jobs at Dell include senior-adviser, engineer, and executive positions.

  • Toptal

    Toptal is a talent network that connects the top 3 percent of software developers with remote work. But the coolest part is that Toptal’s internal team of engineers is completely distributed as well. Toptal has no offices whatsoever. Everyone at the company — from the CEO down to new hires – works remotely.

  • Loot

    Loot offers a WFH position where you complete different actions for your favorite brands, such as taking pictures or sharing content on Facebook and Twitter. The more you work, the more you’ll get paid. This is more of a gig type of job. You have to download the company app to apply.

  • Freelancer.com

    It is a website where you can sign up and get paid for your skills. It has thousands of open jobs where you as a freelancer can work from home in your pajamas. Although most positions are not salaried, there are many jobs that offer near full-time work with flexible hours. This is more of a freelancer type of job where many projects are done on spec.

  • Humana

    Humana has received numerous workplace awards including the Computerworld 100 Best Places to Work in IT, the Best Employer for Healthy Lifestyles award from the National Business Group, and a ranking of 58 on the Fortune 500 list.

  • ADP

    It is one of the world’s largest providers of business-outsourcing and human-capital management solutions. The company offers anumber of full-time, flex, or at-home positions, as well as onsite part-time work.

  • Amazon

    Amazon offers many virtual positions for potential employees living in certain areas, which allows employees to work from home with just a high-speed internet connection, a working landline, and a PC. Unfortunately, for now, VCC positions are available only in Arizona, Kentucky, Texas, West Virginia, Delaware, Minnesota, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, North Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Virginia.

  • TeleTech

    TeleTech offers manycareer paths for telecommuters with a flexible work environment. The program, called TeleTech@Home, has positions for employees who support and assist customers with a variety of service and technical needs, as well as those who carry out back-office functions including chat and social media.

Legal Requirements to Start a Business

Many different elements go into starting a new business. One of the primary requirements for setting up a business is to abide by the legal requirements set by federal, state and county rules and regulations. Abiding by these rules allows you to start your business off on the right path to help you avoid legal issues regarding the business structure in the future.

Here is the list of legal aspects you need to consider for start-up. Depending on your situation and type of business, hiring a tax accountant and/or good attorney with specific experience in your industry can help you.

  • Business name

    Before you start printing out business cards, make sure the great new name you thought of isn’t infringing on the rights of an already existing business. You can perform a free search online that looks at business names registered with the Secretary of State — that will tell you if the name is available in your state. Then, take your search to the next level and conduct a no-conflict, free trademark search to see if your name is available for use in all 50 states.

  • Register a fictitious business name/DBA

    A DBA (Doing Business As) must be filed whenever your company does business under a different name. If you’ve got a sole proprietorship or general partnership, a DBA is needed if your company name is different from your own name. For an LLC or corporation, a DBA must be filed to conduct business using a name that’s different from the official Corporation or LLC name you filed.

  • Incorporate Your Business or Form an LLC

    Forming an LLC or corporation is an essential step to protect your personal assets (such as your personal property or your child’s college fund) from any liabilities of the company. Each business structure has its own advantages and disadvantages, depending on your specific circumstances. Three popular options are: the LLC (great for small businesses that want legal protection, but minimal formality), S Corporation (great for small businesses that can qualify), or C Corporation (for companies who plan to seek funding from a VC or go public).

  • Get Federal Tax ID Number

    To distinguish your business as a separate legal entity, you’ll need to obtain a Federal Tax Identification Number, also referred to as an Employer Identification Number (EIN). Issued by the IRS, the tax ID number is similar to your personal social security number and allows the IRS to track your company’s transactions. If you’re a sole proprietor, you’re not obligated to get a Tax ID number, but it’s still good practice as you won’t have to provide your personal social security number for business matters.

  • Learn about employee laws

    Your legal obligations as an employer begin as soon as you hire your first employee. You should spend time with an employment law professional to fully understand your obligations for these (and other) procedures: federal and state payroll and withholding taxes, self-employment taxes, anti-discrimination laws, OSHA regulations, unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation rules, and wage and hour requirements.

  • Obtain business permits and licenses

    Depending on your business type and physical location, you may be required to have one or more business licenses or permits from the state, local or even federal level. Such licenses include: a general business operation license, zoning and land use permits, sales tax license, health department permits, and occupational or professional licenses.

  • File for trademark protection

    You’re not actually required by law to register a trademark. Using a name instantly gives you common law rights as an owner, even without formal registration. Since you’ve spent untold hours brainstorming the ideal name, and you’ll be putting even more effort into cultivating name recognition, you should consider registering your trademark for proper legal protection.

  • Open a bank account to build business credit

    When you rely on your personal credit to fund your business, your personal mortgage, auto loan and personal credit cards all affect your ability to qualify for a business loan. Using business credit separates your personal activities from that of the business. To begin building your business credit, you should open a bank account in the name of your company, and the account should show a cash flow capable of taking on a business loan.

If you are a start-up owner or have plans of becoming one, we at TheGongzuo.com are eager to assist you. Our experts will provide you guidance regarding your financial or legal matters. Do contact us today!

Interesting Tech Facts

  • The first computer mouse was invented by Doug Engelbart in around 1964 and was made of wood.
  • Alaska is the only state that can be typed on one row of keys on a “QUERTY” keyboard.
  • HP, Google, Microsoft and Apple have one thing in common apart from the obvious that they are IT companies. They were all started in garages.
  • Hewlett Packard was started in a garage in Palo Alto in 1939.
  • Facebook pays at least $500 if you can find a way to hack the site.
  • The Google driverless car has encountered only two accidents. The first it was rear ended at a stop sign, and the second was when a human was behind the wheel.
  • The first online advertisement banner was created and used in the year of 1994.
  • CD’s, or Compact discs read from the inside to the outside edge, which is the reverse of how records work.
  • The word robot comes from the Czech “robota“. This translates into forced labour, or work.
  • Skype is banned from the public in China.
  • 86% of people try to plug their USB devices upside down.
  • 160 billion emails are sent daily, 97% of which are spam.
  • 9 out of every 1,000 computers are infected with spam.
  • S. President Bill Clinton’s inauguration in January 1997 was the first to be webcast.
  • There are 6.8 billion people on the planet and 4 billion of them use a mobile phone. Only 3.5 billion of them use a toothbrush.
  • Two hundred and twenty million tons of old computers and other technology devices are trashed in the United States each year.
  • Ninety percent of text messages are read within three minutes of being delivred.
  • The average 21 year old has spent 5,000 hours playing video games, sent 250,000 emails, instant messages, and text messages, and has spent 10,000 hours on a mobile phone alone.

 

It’s Time to Make a Career Change

People change careers several times during their lifetime. The main reason is that they don’t make informed decisions about the careers they choose. They do not take into account their own interests, values, personality types while selecting career path. Because of these reasons, you may find yourself wondering whether you should be doing something different. Here are some valid reasons to leave your current career for a new one:

  • Loss of purpose and passion

    If your career has no meaning, you are no longer excited about it or you have grown tired of getting up in the morning to compete for something you don’t believe in anymore – it’s time to move on. The financial incentives are not enough, when the chance to find real personal significance and happiness is missing.

  • Talent potential is not valued

    When your talent is not valued, it’s difficult to stay motivated.   When your boss doesn’t trust your potential and will not sponsor your career advancement, it’s extremely hard to remain loyal. You must value your talent potential more than anyone else. Never allow your talent to be taken for granted.  If it is, it may be time to move on.

  • Professional growth is stunted

    If you are unable to challenge yourself to grow and mature, then how can your employer help you? If you think your employer is not investing in your professional development, you must move on. If you don’t stretch yourself to do more or remain in your comfort zone for too long, you will have to pay the price later. Your resume should reflect enough success stories to merit advancement in your career.

  • Workplace culture is not trustworthy

    A hostile work environment that operates in silos – where the executives are not transparent – is difficult to trust. This type of workplace culture becomes corrupted and begins to impact your performance and ability to advance. When you are part of an organization that is full of leadership and workplace problems, it’s time to consider a career change.

  • Not sufficiently awarded

    It’s easy to become contented in your career, but in today’s fiercely competitive and dynamic marketplace, you must be your own manager and continually be accountable to keep a “reward scorecard.”   Rewards are qualitative and quantitative measurements.  If you are not being rewarded for your work – based on industry standards (or better), it’s time to consider a career change.

  • You make excuse for a day off

    Do you make excuses to call in sick or let go opportunities to take lead? It may be time to assess your current career. If your sense of satisfaction fades away, you aren’t worried your performance review didn’t go well, or you spend more time on surfing internet than concentrating on business, it might be time to move on.

  • Your life has changed

    When you chose your career your life may have been different than it is today. For example you may have been single then and now you have a family. The crazy schedule or the frequent travel that is typical of your career may not suit your new lifestyle. You should look for an occupation that is more “family friendly.”

  • Your job is too stressful

    Some occupations are inherently stressful. You knew that from the beginning about yours. You’ve come to a point, though, when it’s become too much to handle. To preserve your mental and physical health, you will have to find a career that is less stressful.

If you want to make a career change, talk to the career counsellor for guidance and making a right move. Think about roles or jobs where you can use the knowledge and skills you already possess. If you are convinced that you want to make a career change, then take a dive! There is never a perfect time, so don’t wait. Try to prepare plan B, and then do it!

How to Find Internships

Internships can be a great way to get your foot in the door, gaining valuable work experience in a position that would not normally be open to someone with your skills. Finding one and getting it can be hard though. Follow these strategies to land great internships.

  • Look for internship listings

    Visit career services office of your school or regularly browse their website to check internship listings. Many companies also post internship positions on their ‘career’ web page. Select a number of different internships and be sure to follow the application instructions precisely. Many internships are very competitive and until you hear back from an employer – don’t assume that you will be accepted. Be proactive by continuing to apply to new internships as you find them.

  • Make a good resume

    You know what you are good at but the employer will need to see them in ink. Ready your resume, highlighting the skills that could be beneficial in that field and mention your achievements in previous internships or a project at college where you volunteered. Showcasing your skills, while keeping in the mind the requirements for the job, plays an important role in getting yourself the right internship.

  • Do your research

    Before going for an interview, research on not only the company and its products, but also on the business itself. Read about company’s stock market performance, its employees, their backgrounds, competitors, media coverage regarding news about the company etc. Potential interns who get noticed in an interview or on the job are the ones who have an opinion- they aren’t afraid to speak up, give input and contribute to brainstorming sessions. But in order to have effective and credible input, one has to put in the time and do the research.

  • Use and know the product

    Being unfamiliar with the product or web site of the company is fatal- because interviewers will get to know about your ignorance. Candidates, who have used the product or know it well, share insight and knowledge and they even have stories about how the product has helped them in their career etc.

  • Weigh benefits correctly

    Weigh the benefits of internship in terms of the value they add to your profile the knowledge that you gain from that role. Taking up just any internship is not good for your profile. Get the one that is relevant to the career you intend to pursue.

If you are looking for internship positions with renowned companies, log on to ThGongzuo.com to find the right internship and save your precious time.

Culture Questions to Ask before Taking up Job

culture-questions-to-ask-before-taking-up-job

When you are in the process of job hunting, you get eager to land a job that you would love. And when you get an interview call, you obviously get very excited and face the interview well-prepared. At such times, it gets very tough to reject the job offer on the criteria other than salary. But, it is very important to find whether you will be ‘culturally’ fit within that organization or not. Remember, you can’t work where you don’t feel comfortable.  The culture of the company you’re applying for carries tremendous weight on your decision to work there. Therefore, before you accept a job, conduct ‘culture audit’ to assess company’s culture.

What is a culture?
Culture is one very important way in which employees describe where they work. It underlies their understanding of the employer’s business and helps employees orient themselves in the organization. Company culture is the shared values, practices and beliefs of the company’s employees. From hiring practices to how people work, make decisions, resolve differences of opinions, and navigate change, the culture defines the unwritten but very real rules of behaviour. If you are job seeker in that company, you should take into account its culture.

If you ask an interviewer following types of questions, you will understand a company’s culture:

  • What makes you proud to work at this company?
  • How would you describe the culture here in few words?
  • What’s the process for on-boarding employees, and how do you handle beginner mistakes?
  • Are the firm’s executives approachable?
  • Is employee input sought for new initiatives including strategy?
  • How are big decisions made?
  • Does the firm get together when new sales records or big customer orders are achieved?
  • Could you please give examples of people who succeeded wildly within the boundaries of the organization?
  • What’s the difference between an average employee and the best one in this role/department/company?
  • Is risk-taking encouraged and what if people fail?
  • How does the organization support professional development and career growth?
  • Are there formal quality initiatives in place such as Six Sigma or Lean?
  • What’s one thing you would change about this company if you could?

Company culture is everything. You can’t work where you don’t fit. Ask a few of these questions on your next interview, and you’ll be sure to find the organization that’s the right environment for you.

Be an effective IT leader by hiring top talents available in the industry

“As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others.”

– Bill Gates

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