Excellent Work-From-Home Job Opportunities

“Make Thousands of Dollars Working from Home!” sounds like a scam and most of the time, it is. But, the great news is, remote work options are available and they are on the rise.
Whether you want to work at your house in your pajamas, from your local coffee shop, or while traveling the world, the following companies can help you achieve your Work-From-Home desires.

  • Apple

    Tech giant Apple has At Home Advisor position that allows employees to work remotely as customer support agents. The role is to translate technology into a language customers can understand. The position offers benefits such as employee discounts, the opportunity to grow with Apple, and a free iMac to use while working from home. The job is also a great gig for college students, who can schedule their work around classes.

  • Xerox

    Xerox has an extensive WFH program of over 8,000 home-based employees, which is known as theVirtual Workforce Program. Home-based employees are involved in a variety of functions, including customer care, tech support, quality control, software development, and much more.

  • Dell

    Although Dell is headquartered in Round Rock, Texas, the company offers employee work options that include flextime, remote work, job sharing, part-time work, and compressed workweeks. Current openings for flexible jobs at Dell include senior-adviser, engineer, and executive positions.

  • Toptal

    Toptal is a talent network that connects the top 3 percent of software developers with remote work. But the coolest part is that Toptal’s internal team of engineers is completely distributed as well. Toptal has no offices whatsoever. Everyone at the company — from the CEO down to new hires – works remotely.

  • Loot

    Loot offers a WFH position where you complete different actions for your favorite brands, such as taking pictures or sharing content on Facebook and Twitter. The more you work, the more you’ll get paid. This is more of a gig type of job. You have to download the company app to apply.

  • Freelancer.com

    It is a website where you can sign up and get paid for your skills. It has thousands of open jobs where you as a freelancer can work from home in your pajamas. Although most positions are not salaried, there are many jobs that offer near full-time work with flexible hours. This is more of a freelancer type of job where many projects are done on spec.

  • Humana

    Humana has received numerous workplace awards including the Computerworld 100 Best Places to Work in IT, the Best Employer for Healthy Lifestyles award from the National Business Group, and a ranking of 58 on the Fortune 500 list.

  • ADP

    It is one of the world’s largest providers of business-outsourcing and human-capital management solutions. The company offers anumber of full-time, flex, or at-home positions, as well as onsite part-time work.

  • Amazon

    Amazon offers many virtual positions for potential employees living in certain areas, which allows employees to work from home with just a high-speed internet connection, a working landline, and a PC. Unfortunately, for now, VCC positions are available only in Arizona, Kentucky, Texas, West Virginia, Delaware, Minnesota, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, North Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Virginia.

  • TeleTech

    TeleTech offers manycareer paths for telecommuters with a flexible work environment. The program, called TeleTech@Home, has positions for employees who support and assist customers with a variety of service and technical needs, as well as those who carry out back-office functions including chat and social media.

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Hiring Trends for 2017

Hiring is going to be a challenge for tech positions, particularly for security and networking roles. Here is a glimpse of what is expected on the hiring front in 2017. The following forecast is based on the research conducted by Robert Half Technology and TEKsystems.

  • Marginal salary gains

    Majority of IT leaders expect IT salaries to stay the same compared to 2016 rates. Many organizations are relying on rate cards from several years ago, and the IT segment is suffering a degree of wage stagnation.

  • Some skills are more likely to get raises

    There won’t be department-wise salary hikes, but in-demand roles will get raises. These roles will be – programmers & developers, software engineers, security and cloud based computing.

  • IT headcount expanding for some

    Some companies will add new positions in the year 2017. Most of them will put IT hiring on hold.

  • Contingent IT staff increasing

    IT leaders report that in 2016, 80% of their IT team members are full-time staffers and 20% are contingent workers. Looking ahead to 2017, CIOs are predicting a slight shift in the ratio of full-time staff (76%) to contingent workers (24%).

  • Skills in greatest demand

    Database management, desktop support, network administration and cybersecurity are the most in-demand skills.

  • Explosion of tech roles

    Our technology-driven lifestyles mean that more employers in finance, retail, healthcare, etc., need employees who can derive insights from data, create a mobile app, or code a website. A tight overall hiring market and increased demand for tech talent makes recruiting those coding and analytics stars even more difficult.

  • Pay transparency

    Transparency in the workplace isn’t new, but in 2016 we saw a big push from policymakers for employers to be more transparent about pay. New rules from the federal government will require some employers to disclose workers’ pay by gender, race/ethnicity. In 2017, employers should prepare for increased salary negotiations.

Legal Requirements to Start a Business

Many different elements go into starting a new business. One of the primary requirements for setting up a business is to abide by the legal requirements set by federal, state and county rules and regulations. Abiding by these rules allows you to start your business off on the right path to help you avoid legal issues regarding the business structure in the future.

Here is the list of legal aspects you need to consider for start-up. Depending on your situation and type of business, hiring a tax accountant and/or good attorney with specific experience in your industry can help you.

  • Business name

    Before you start printing out business cards, make sure the great new name you thought of isn’t infringing on the rights of an already existing business. You can perform a free search online that looks at business names registered with the Secretary of State — that will tell you if the name is available in your state. Then, take your search to the next level and conduct a no-conflict, free trademark search to see if your name is available for use in all 50 states.

  • Register a fictitious business name/DBA

    A DBA (Doing Business As) must be filed whenever your company does business under a different name. If you’ve got a sole proprietorship or general partnership, a DBA is needed if your company name is different from your own name. For an LLC or corporation, a DBA must be filed to conduct business using a name that’s different from the official Corporation or LLC name you filed.

  • Incorporate Your Business or Form an LLC

    Forming an LLC or corporation is an essential step to protect your personal assets (such as your personal property or your child’s college fund) from any liabilities of the company. Each business structure has its own advantages and disadvantages, depending on your specific circumstances. Three popular options are: the LLC (great for small businesses that want legal protection, but minimal formality), S Corporation (great for small businesses that can qualify), or C Corporation (for companies who plan to seek funding from a VC or go public).

  • Get Federal Tax ID Number

    To distinguish your business as a separate legal entity, you’ll need to obtain a Federal Tax Identification Number, also referred to as an Employer Identification Number (EIN). Issued by the IRS, the tax ID number is similar to your personal social security number and allows the IRS to track your company’s transactions. If you’re a sole proprietor, you’re not obligated to get a Tax ID number, but it’s still good practice as you won’t have to provide your personal social security number for business matters.

  • Learn about employee laws

    Your legal obligations as an employer begin as soon as you hire your first employee. You should spend time with an employment law professional to fully understand your obligations for these (and other) procedures: federal and state payroll and withholding taxes, self-employment taxes, anti-discrimination laws, OSHA regulations, unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation rules, and wage and hour requirements.

  • Obtain business permits and licenses

    Depending on your business type and physical location, you may be required to have one or more business licenses or permits from the state, local or even federal level. Such licenses include: a general business operation license, zoning and land use permits, sales tax license, health department permits, and occupational or professional licenses.

  • File for trademark protection

    You’re not actually required by law to register a trademark. Using a name instantly gives you common law rights as an owner, even without formal registration. Since you’ve spent untold hours brainstorming the ideal name, and you’ll be putting even more effort into cultivating name recognition, you should consider registering your trademark for proper legal protection.

  • Open a bank account to build business credit

    When you rely on your personal credit to fund your business, your personal mortgage, auto loan and personal credit cards all affect your ability to qualify for a business loan. Using business credit separates your personal activities from that of the business. To begin building your business credit, you should open a bank account in the name of your company, and the account should show a cash flow capable of taking on a business loan.

If you are a start-up owner or have plans of becoming one, we at TheGongzuo.com are eager to assist you. Our experts will provide you guidance regarding your financial or legal matters. Do contact us today!

Interesting Tech Facts

  • The first computer mouse was invented by Doug Engelbart in around 1964 and was made of wood.
  • Alaska is the only state that can be typed on one row of keys on a “QUERTY” keyboard.
  • HP, Google, Microsoft and Apple have one thing in common apart from the obvious that they are IT companies. They were all started in garages.
  • Hewlett Packard was started in a garage in Palo Alto in 1939.
  • Facebook pays at least $500 if you can find a way to hack the site.
  • The Google driverless car has encountered only two accidents. The first it was rear ended at a stop sign, and the second was when a human was behind the wheel.
  • The first online advertisement banner was created and used in the year of 1994.
  • CD’s, or Compact discs read from the inside to the outside edge, which is the reverse of how records work.
  • The word robot comes from the Czech “robota“. This translates into forced labour, or work.
  • Skype is banned from the public in China.
  • 86% of people try to plug their USB devices upside down.
  • 160 billion emails are sent daily, 97% of which are spam.
  • 9 out of every 1,000 computers are infected with spam.
  • S. President Bill Clinton’s inauguration in January 1997 was the first to be webcast.
  • There are 6.8 billion people on the planet and 4 billion of them use a mobile phone. Only 3.5 billion of them use a toothbrush.
  • Two hundred and twenty million tons of old computers and other technology devices are trashed in the United States each year.
  • Ninety percent of text messages are read within three minutes of being delivred.
  • The average 21 year old has spent 5,000 hours playing video games, sent 250,000 emails, instant messages, and text messages, and has spent 10,000 hours on a mobile phone alone.

 

Turn Your Expertise into a Business

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Subject matter specialization is an important skill set to call someone an expert in something. If you are an expert in something and you want to convert it in to business, you need to be accepted for your expertise. People need to see you in action. They need to see results. And, people should decide to buy the product or service you are willing to create out of your expertise. You need to set a plan of action. And, as always it all starts with a well-planned business strategy.

Do you know enough?
You have an expertise and want to start a business. Do you know enough about the industry? With industry background and know-how, you’ll be ahead of the curve. If you have a great idea, but aren’t familiar enough with the field to get started, use your network, speak with people who’ve started businesses in your industry to help you get up to speed quickly.

Surround yourself with people who share your idea
Hire people who share similar interests, if not passion! You can expect long work hours and hard days in the beginning, so personal drive and similar values with your colleagues will take you through initial turbulence.

Business Funds
You need funds. Smart fund allocation and streamlined spending is crucial for any business process. In reality, any kind of skill set can be streamlined to produce regular profits. While quantity matters a great deal to produce regular profits in any business, quality is crucial to attract regular and loyal customers to your service. Successful businesses never compromise on quality.

Time
Quality is achieved by investing the required amount of time. You will never achieve anything by rushing. Consistent and scheduled work culture is crucial for the success of any business process. Overworking and under working are both harmful for any kind of business. Overworking can lead to attitude saturation and eventual productivity mess up. Under working can kill profits.

Easy ways to turn your expertise into a business:

  • Consultancy services – If you have vast know-how and skills in a particular field, you can be paid lucratively by sharing your expertise with others.
  • Start a blog – If you have specialized knowledge about a particular topic, you can start a blog or a website on that subject. You can join affiliate programs or use advertisements to earn money from your blog/ website.
  • Teach what you know – If you have vast knowledge about a particular topic, you can offer lessons at a fee. You can begin by teaching at seminars or hire yourself out as a tutor.

Turning your expertise into a successful business not only allows you to be profitable while doing something you love; it helps set you up for lasting success. Most importantly, passion is central to making decisions that are in the long-term interest of the customer and the company, which will help you, establish sustainability and longevity for your brand.

What’s In a Name?

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Creativity is the essence of the tech world and it is evident even with the names of tech companies. There is a story behind the names of most of the companies.

Here’s a look how some of these well-known tech giants got their names:

  • Apple – Steve Jobs liked apples a lot. The other reason he named his company ‘Apple’ was that “Apple” was ahead of “Atari” in the phonebook and he used to work at Atari.
  • Amazon – Bezos wanted his book retail site to be so quick and easy that it seemed like magic. The site went online in 1995 with the name of Amazon, taken from the Amazon River for being the biggest river. Clearly, Bezos had big ambitions right from the start.
  • Google – Google took its name from a deliberate misspelling of Googol, the word that represents 10^100, or a 1 followed by 100 zeroes. Why this? Simply because founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page wanted to convey the huge amount of data they intended to make available.
  • Microsoft – The company was officially established in April 1975, with the name coming from a combination of “microprocessor” and “software” – which is fitting given that they were creating software for the Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems’s (MITS) Altair 8800.
  • Oracle – This name started as the code for a project that co-founders Larry Ellison and Bob Oats worked on for the CIA. It was a database that was supposed to be able to answer any question about anything.
  • Mozilla – In 1994, when a team at Netscape sat around to think of names for a new browser to take on NCSA’s Mosaic browser, what they were looking for was something that would crush the competition. What they looked to was Godzilla. Combining Mosaic with the movie monster brings you to the current day name of Mozilla.
  • Asus – The name is derived from the mythological Greek winged horse Pegasus. According to the company’s own explanation it embodies the strength, purity, and adventurous spirit of this fantastic creature, and soars to new heights with each new product it creates.
  • Lenovo – The word is a combination of Le and Novo, meaning new in Latin.
  • Skype – It’s a combination of “sky” and “peer-to-peer”, shortened to skyper. The name ‘Skyper’ was already in use, so the new name became ‘Skype’.
  • Twitter – Founders first thought of ‘twitch’. But ‘twitch’ was not a good product name because it doesn’t bring up the right imagery. So, they looked up dictionary and found ‘twitter’. The definition was ‘a short burst of inconsequential information,’ and ‘chirps from birds.’ And that’s exactly what the product was.
  • eBay – The website started out as “AuctionWeb,” a part of the personal website of former Apple software engineer Pierre Omidyar. The website took off, and Mr. Omidyar decided to spin it off into its own entity and name it afterhis consulting firm, Echo Bay Technology Group. When the domain name echobay.com was taken, he switched it to ebay.com.
  • Verizon – According to Verizon’s corporate history, the name is a combination of the Latin words “veritas” and “horizon.” Veritas refers to truth and reliability, while horizon signifies forward-looking and visionary.
  • Blackberry – This name was coined in 1999 because the keys on the device resembled the drupelets on the fruit.

I Missed an Interview. What Should I Do Next?

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An interview is your opportunity to impress an employer and show how perfect you are for the job. Missing the interview or arriving late can jeopardize your chances and is something you should avoid at all costs. However, unavoidable situations sometimes occur that would make it impossible to attend. If you take appropriate steps immediately, you might be able to appease the employer and get a second chance.

The right thing to do, regardless of the reason why you missed the interview, is to send the recruiter a formal letter or email message of apology/explanation. It’s best to keep your letter or message brief but sincere. Take responsibility for your failure to appear for the interview. If you still want to work for the company and you had a good reason for missing the interview, let the recruiter know this, too. It can’t hurt and you might get a second chance!

Even if you were caught among unavoidable circumstances, missing an interview is highly unprofessional. But, still you can request the employer to reschedule your interview. He/she may refuse, but you can try. If the interviewer does agree to schedule another meeting, make note of the time and date, and thank him or her for the opportunity.

If the interviewer agrees to reschedule the meeting, make an effort to arrive at least 15 minutes early. Thank the interviewer for the opportunity, but do not mention the missed interview and do not make any excuses about it. Be polite, professional and do your best to show the interviewer that you’re a reliable, competent candidate. Good luck!